testers

Tips /

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7 Feb, 2018


Preparing reports have somehow become a most focused part of my testing grooves, though, I was not prepared for it but now I am doing it.

Yes, us, testers, have to prepare a bug report to conclude our activity and task status on the daily basis. We like it or not, it’s a must now!

C’mon, it is not that bad, it’s actually fun making a bug report when you have completed every testing task on time.

We often write notes, documentation, importation pointers, key messages, journals to convey information, views, observations, feedback, and most of all the bug report.

Writing best comes when it is practiced, and same is the case with a bug report! Therefore, to make an effective communication bridge, it is vital to pen down your ideas and activities It is crucial that we assure that no important part of the information is miscommunicated or missed in that report. In fact, a poorly created bug report may not benefit the project, your team, or even you, as a tester.

At the initial level of bug reporting, I, myself made many blunders. I used to submit inadequate and hard to apprehend information that often failed all my deliberate efforts of a good presentation. Just like a rookie tester, I’d miss on these very key points while making the report:

  • Used extensive sentences thus distracting the real issue.
  • Wrote incomplete sentences that only created confusion in reader’s mind.
  • Had Put most of my concentration on the vocabulary.
  • Presented a long list of issues in the same test report.
  • Provide partial information and expected developers and team to assume the other half data.

Consequently, I could not help, but seeing the project slipping out of my hands and failing miserably remained the only choice for me. Developers too did not show any interest in reading my bug reports as they could not comprehend the issues presented in the report. I must add that, for some time, I lost my value that even the Dev guys gave my bug report the last priority in the projects.

But what happened is I began to understand the importance of explicit writing and gradually, learned to make a proficient bug report.

It is my advice that every tester should understand the importance of preparing a proper and detailed bug report. Only practice can help testers improve their writing skills and utilize them as a tool to make communication better and add value to the product.

Here, I have compiled the most resourceful points that conceptualize the definition of a good bug report:

Bug Number/ Identification Number

A bug number or identification number is ideally significant in bug reporting since it makes bug referencing quite easier. Through the bug number, even developers can cross-check what bug has been fixed or needs fixing.

Bug Titling

Titles, heading, or bullets are more readable because they are more visible. A title demonstrates the core issue in a particular bug. Also, it gives developers a quick outlook if that test case has been fixed or is still pending.

Interface/Environment

The OS and a particular environment are essential for an obvious bug report. Because without a corresponding browser or platform the product may perform differently and likewise, the bug at tester’s end may not also replicate on the developer’s end. Hence, it’s the best strategy to clearly mention the environment in which the bug was identified.

Description

A very precise and accurate description of the bug detected can productively decrease the time span. So, make it short but spot on!

Screenshot

A bug screenshot can add a thousand words in the report without saying. So, adding a screenshot won’t be an idea in the back seat.

Feedback

An effective feedback about the expected results and achieved results can greatly help in making future improvements in the product. So, make sure you give an accurate account of it.

Okay, so, this is what I have learned in the long testing journey. As I mentioned earlier, making a bug report is not climbing a steep mountain, you just need practice and you will get there quicker than you thought!

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